Hollywood stereotypes not accurate portrayals of people

We live in a stereotypical world. Stereotypes influence how we dress, how we act and what we do. These stereotypes are played out all around us — especially in the movies we watch on the big screen. 

Several stereotypes that we oftentimes see are offensive to those who fit the description, and it has almost become a social norm to immediately think of that stereotype when we see someone who fits it. 

Logically we should know that these stereotypes aren’t always true. They don’t apply to everyone, but because we see them so often in movies and TV shows we’re made to believe that almost everyone fits into a certain stereotype. 

Stereotypes can shape our image of people and ultimately have a negative impact on the way we see our peers. If we shape our beliefs and assumptions based on what we see in movies, then we may cower every time we see someone who looks different from us. 

Seeing stereotypes on the big screen makes our views of people more concrete. Everyone has, at one time or another, looked at someone and immediately thought of a stereotype. 

That’s not how the world should be. First off, we should not judge people based off an inaccurate stereotype. 

This doesn’t make the world a better place. It diminishes peaceful human interaction. 

In a world where there is already so much negativity and hate surrounding us, we need to focus on respecting others with their race, religion, gender, or sexuality aside. 

When we watch a movie and notice a stereotype, we need to realize that it is not how people actually act. Instead, if we question it, we need to research and educate ourselves about the group of people. 

We’re never going to change Hollywood. We can try, but it is nearly impossible. 

However, what we can do is identify these stereotypes and how accurate they actually are. We shouldn’t base our judgements of people off of the stereotypes 

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OUR POSITION: 

The staff is in agreement that Hollywood shouldn’t push sterotypes because they can have a negative impact on the groups of people that they are about.


OUR BOARD: 

The opinions, beliefs and viewpoints expressed by the various authors in the opinion section do not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs and viewpoints of the entire The Franklin staff. Opinion editor Christina Ramey moderates the board and its members, including Brittney Corum, Adrianna Pitrelli, Matt Thomas and Ashley Steeb. Leigh Durphey, the executive editor, sits on the board. If you have an issue you would like the board to cover, email christina.ramey@franklincollege.edu.

About The Franklin staff 58 Articles
The Franklin is the student newspaper at Franklin College in Franklin, Indiana. We publish depth campus news weekly.

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